How to Draw Flounder, from The Little Mermaid

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Book Review Learn to Draw The Little Mermaid

In this 40 paged illustrated step-by-step book you will learn how to draw Flounder and Ariel, The Little Mermaid along with a combination of portraits, expressions and poses for six of the characters from the movie – Ariel, Sebastian, Flounder, Ursula, Scuttle, and Eric.

This book is a combination of rough step-by-step drawings and finished character illustrations.

The oversized drawings make following along easy but the large amount of detail on some character poses and expressions will challenge less advanced and younger artists.

While the artist is clearly guided through the construction process, the step-by-step drawings sometimes lack consistency, which will frustrate a detail-oriented artist.

 

Sample Step-by-Step

Step 1

how to draw flounder from the little mermaid, step 1

Step 2

how to draw flounder from the little mermaid, step 2

Step 3

how to draw flounder from the little mermaid, step 3

Step 4

how to draw flounder from the little mermaid, step 4

Step 5

how to draw flounder from the little mermaid, step 5

Step 6

how to draw flounder from the little mermaid, step 6

 

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How to Draw Belle, from Beauty And The Beast

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Book Review Learn to Draw Disney Princesses

Learn how to draw Belle, from Beauty and the Beast, and six other Disney Princesses – Snow White, Cinderella, Sleeping Beauty, Ariel, Jasmine, and Tinker Bell.

In this 32 paged illustrated step-by-step book you will learn how to draw portraits and poses for each of the seven Disney Princesses.

Each step of the drawing process is clearly illustrated and finished color illustrations are provided for each character.

Disney fans of all ages will enjoy this book and love recreating their favorite characters.

While the book is easy to follow, it is recommended for ages six and up.

 

Sample Step-by-Step

Step 1

how to draw belle from beauty and the beast, step 1

Step 2

how to draw belle from beauty and the beast, step 2

Step 3

how to draw belle from beauty and the beast, step 3

Step 4

how to draw belle from beauty and the beast, step 4

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St. Patrick’s Day Shamrock Suncatcher

Shamrock Suncatcher

St. Patrick’s Day crafts, like a shamrock suncatcher, will brighten your room in lovely shades of green. The only supplies you will need are wax paper, crayon shavings, and an iron. With adult supervision, this is a great craft for kid’s.

 

 

 

Supplies

  • Crayons
  • Pencil Sharpener
  • Wax Paper
  • Iron

 

Step-by-Step

Step 1

Begin by cutting a 24″ long piece of wax paper. Fold the paper in half and then unfold. Using a pencil sharpener, create and then deposit wax-crayon shavings onto one side of the wax paper.

shamrock suncatcher, step 1

 

Step 2

Fold the clean half of the wax paper over crayon shavings. Then crimp the three open edges shut with one inch folds  (if you don’t the crayon will seep out of the sides). The crayon shavings should now be secure. Place multiple sheets of craft paper onto your ironing surface. Place the wax paper/crayon shavings onto the craft paper and cover it all with another sheet of craft paper. The craft paper will protect your iron and ironing surface.

shamrock suncatcher, step 2

 

Step 3

Iron on a low heat, checking after each pass. Stop ironing once the shavings have melted. Let the wax paper/crayon shavings cool.

shamrock suncatcher, step 3

 

Step 4

Print off the template below at various sizes. Trace and cut out the shamrocks.

shamrock suncatcher, template

shamrock suncatcher, step 4

 

Step 5

String and hang the shamrocks.

shamrock suncatcher, step 5

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Inspiration – Books

Books can inform us, influence us, motivate us, and transport our imaginations to new worlds. Many artists, inspired by their love of reading, have used books as source material for new, stunning visual works of art.

 

 

 

 

Mireille Vautier

 Livres – Book, and thread

Agendas – Book, and thread

 

Kirsten Anderson

Monkey, 2011 – Mixed media on book

Der Zugvogel, 2011 – Mixed media on book

 

Julia Strand

Compton’s Pictured Encyclopedia: P(aintings)

Double-sided Gray’s Anatomy

 

Robert The 

Untitled – Books

Tractatus Work, 2004 – Book

 

Jacqueline Rush Lee

Lorem Ipsum II: From the Summer Reading Series, 2010 – Manipulated, ink-splashed, hand-stitched book assemblage

Inside Out

 

Georgia Russell

L’Erotisme, 2008 – Cut and painted book in bell jar

Manifestes du Surréalisme, 2009 – Cut book in bell jar

 

Su Blackwell

The Baron in the Trees, 2011 – Book and mixed-media

Wild Flowers, 2006 – Book and mixed-media

 

Nicholas Jones

Untitled – Book, folded pages

Untitled – Book, folded pages

 

Guy Laramee

Grand Larousse, 2010 – Books, and mixed-media

Longmen, 2010 – Books, and wood base

 

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Artist Spotlight – John Dilnot

Mixed-media artist and printmaker John Dilnot uses printed papers, maps, twigs, and found objects to create intricate unique worlds contained within wooden boxes. Take a look at some of his recent works, posted below.

 

Natural History, 2010 – Book, printed papers, wood and glass

Moth Collection, 2010 – Printed papers, wood and glass

Pocket Atlas – Heading South, 2010 – Pocket atlas, printed papers, wood and glass

The Old Forest, 2010 – Printed papers, twigs, wood and glass

Somewhere and Nowhere, 2010 – Printed papers, map, wood and glass

Into the Wood, 2010 – Printed papers, twigs, wood and glass

Over the Thames, 2011 – Found map, printed papers, wood and glass

Ermin Street, 2011 – Printed papers, found map, twigs, wood and glass

In the Wash, 2011 – Printed papers, found map, wood and glass

Bad Apples, 2010 – Acrylic, printed papers, wood and glass

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Inspiration – Maps and Charts

Maps and charts have long guided us through our travels of the world. With an intriguing combination of line, color and texture, maps and charts can be a source of creative inspiration for works of art and craft, as seen in the examples below.

 

 

 

 

Matthew Cusick

Course of Empire (Mixmaster 1), 2003 – Maps and acrylic on panel

Many Rivers, 2009 – Maps and acrylic on panel

 

Nikki Rosato

Two Bostons, 2009 – Cut map and armature wire

Untitled, 2010 – Cut map and spotlights

 

Claire Brewster

I have seen the great bear, I have, 2011 – Cut atlas, pins, foam core and box frame

Searching for the remains, 2011 – Cut map, pins, foam core and box frame

 

Matthew Berry

Star Chart Bracelet, 2011 – Star chart, resin and  antique brass bracelet bezels

Constellation Map Bracelet, 2011 – Constellation map, resin and antique brass bracelet bezels

 

Emma McNally 

e, 2011 –  Graphite on paper

CSF, 2011 – Graphite on paper

 

Mark H. Adams

Shondras and Ginger, 2011 – Ink and acrylic on maps

Lost Road, 2011 – Ink and acrylic on map

 

Elisabeth Lecourt

Le chateau d’eau, 2011 – Map of the world

Le chateau de sable, 2011 – Map of the United Kingdom

 

Joao Machado

Swimming, 2007 – Map collage

Couple, 2006 – Map collage

 

Lekan Jeyifo

Settlements and City Strategies (series), 2011 – Digital illustration

Settlements and City Strategies (series), 2011 – Digital illustration

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Inspiration – Artist Sketchbooks

 

“It is only by drawing often, drawing everything, drawing incessantly, that one fine day you discover to your surprise that you have rendered something in its true character.” ~ Camille Pissarro

 

 

Artist sketchbooks are an important tool for creative people. It provides a place to capture experiences and thoughts quickly and expressively while honing drawing and observational skills. Artists sketchbooks are also an excellent source of inspiration as the following collection illustrates.

 

Wil Freeborn

 

Mattias Adolfsson

 

François Kurius

 

Murray Dewhurst

 

Tia

 

Eduardo Salavisa

 

Vickie Henderson

 

James Jean

 

José Azevedo

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Pastel Paper: Choosing a Surface

 

“Bright colours or dark ones, sparkling clarity or misty atmosphere, landscape, still life, portrait – I haven’t met a subject, style or mood yet that can’t be portrayed beautifully in pastel.” ~Dave Beckett

 

 

Before you begin any pastel painting you need to pick your paper. The three most important factors in choosing a piece of pastel paper are texture, color and tone.

 

Texture is the first factor to consider when picking your paper. Pastel paper has a subtle texture, which allows the paper to capture particles of color off of a pastel stick.

When a pastel stick is drawn lightly across a piece of pastel paper, the high points of texture are allowed to shine through the pastel pigment. When a pastel stick is drawn heavily across a piece of pastel paper, the texture is crushed and a solid application of color is achieved, as seen below.

pastel paper, texture

A smooth paper surface will allow for a subtle blending of colors.

pastel paper, smooth paper surface

A rough paper surface will break up of the color, creating a visual energy and sparkle.

pastel paper, rough paper surface

 

Color options abound when choosing pastel paper. Since the paper surface is often visible in a finished painting an artist needs to consider the visual effect that they want to create. A color can be picked that will either harmonize with the subject matter or contrast with it.

pastel paper, colored paper surfaces

 

Tone is equally as important as color in the pastel paper selection. The papers “tone” refers to the lightness or darkness of the paper color, regardless of the color itself.

Light-toned papers tend to highlight dark pastel colors.

pastel paper, light-toned paper surfaces

Dark-toned papers feature the light pastel colors.

pastel paper, dark-toned paper surfaces

 

Tip

When starting out with pastels, a mid-toned paper is typically a good surface choice since it provides a harmonious backdrop for most pastel colors.

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Color Terminology

 

Color, like art, is a subjective experience. While there are no hard rules for color usage, knowing how color reacts will help you to create successful works of art.

In order to begin understanding the principles of color, it is useful to have a basic knowledge of common terminology used by artists.

 

Analogous Color

Analogous colors are any three colors side by side on the color wheel.

color, analogous colors

 

Chroma

The chroma of a color is the purity of that color. The less white or gray in a color, the higher the chroma.

color, chroma

 

Color Spectrum

The visible color spectrum is the visible band of colors produced when sunlight passes through a prism. It is composed of the colors red, orange, yellow, green, blue, indigo, and violet.

 color, color spectrum

 

Color Wheel

The color wheel is a simplified version of the visible color spectrum, bent into a circle. The wheel includes primary, secondary, and tertiary colors, from which all the other colors – including neutrals – are mixed.

color, color wheel

 

Complementary Colors

Complementary colors are colors that are opposite one another on the color wheel.

color, complementary colors

 

Cool Colors

Cool colors are colors that fall in the purple-blue-green section of the color wheel. Cool colors appear to fall back while warm colors appear to come forward. Contrasting cool and warm colors help create the illusion of space and form within a composition.

color, cool colors

 

Hue

Hue is another word for color, referring to the generalized color of an object. The term hue is also used to describe a subtle gradation or variety of colors; warm hues, cool hues, pale hues, etc.

color, hue

 

Intensity

Intensity, often referred to as chroma or saturation, refers to how bright or strong a color is. Pure colors are strong in intensity while grayed colors are weak. Colors becomes less intense as white, black or a complimentary colors are introduced into the mix.

color, intensity

 

Primary Colors

Primary colors are the colors within the color wheel that cannot be made by mixing any other colors.

color, primary colors

 

Saturation

The saturation of a color depends upon how far removed it is from its neutral. The saturation of a color can vary depending upon the lighting conditions.

color, saturation

 

Secondary Colors

Secondary Colors are created from equal parts of any two primary colors within the color wheel.

color, secondary colors

 

Shade

A shade is a color that has been darkened by the addition of black.

color, shade

 

Tertiary Colors

Tertiary Colors are created from equal parts of a primary color and the secondary color next to it within the color wheel.

color, tertiary colors

 

Tint

A tint is a color that has been lightened by the addition of white.

color, tint

 

Tone

The tone, or value, is the relative lightness or darkness of a color.

color, tone

 

Value

The value of a color refers to the amount of white or black in that color.

color, value

 

Warm Colors

Warm colors are colors that fall in the yellow-orange-red section of the color wheel. Warm colors appear to come forward while cool colors appear to fall back. Contrasting cool and warm colors helps create the illusion of space and form within a composition.

color, warm colors

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The Artist Color Wheel

 

 

“Color! What a deep and mysterious language, the language of dreams.” ~ Paul Gauguin

 

 

 

Color Wheel

The artist color wheel is a simplified version of the color spectrum, bent into a circle. The wheel includes primary, secondary, and tertiary colors, from which all the other colors – including neutrals – are mixed.

artist color wheel

 

Primary Colors

Primary colors cannot be made by mixing any other colors. Primary colors in the artist color wheel are red, yellow and blue.

artist color wheel, primary colors

 

Secondary Colors

Secondary Colors are created from equal parts of any two primary colors. Secondary colors in the artist color wheel are violet, green and orange.

artist color wheel, secondary colors

 

Tertiary Colors

Tertiary Colors are created from equal parts of a primary color and the secondary color next to it. Tertiary colors in the artist color wheel are red-orange, red-violet, blue-violet, blue-green, yellow-green and yellow-orange.

artist color wheel, tertiary colors

 

Tip

Create color wheels out of each of your favorite artist materials. Doing this will allow you to see how the colors of each material will react next to each other.

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